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Seeking a SEL Project Coach to Join Our Staff

Posted on August 6th, 2019 in: Blog

Vermont Afterschool is hiring!

Social Emotional Learning Project Coach

Reports to: Assistant Director, Vermont Afterschool

Project Summary: The Social Emotional Learning Coach will support a project initiative at Vermont Afterschool around social emotional learning (SEL). A central component of the project is to work with center-based afterschool site coordinators and directors to build social emotional competencies for staff and children. The Coach’s role is to continue to develop the SEL initiative for Vermont Afterschool, help afterschool programs implement SEL and behavior support strategies, organize and facilitate professional communities of practice in SEL, and to develop and deliver workshops and trainings around SEL content for the afterschool field. This position is estimated to be 16 to 24 hours per week. This is a short-term project through June 2020, with the potential to expand.

Key Responsibilities:

The SEL Coach will work intensively with afterschool program sites to support staff knowledge of SEL principles and implementation of SEL strategies. It is expected that the Coach will provide facilitated meetings with frontline afterschool staff at each participating program. The SEL Coach will support project implementation through key activities:

  • Organizing, scheduling, and facilitating monthly community of practice gatherings for two to four regional groups focused on SEL content and a group consultation model.
  • Developing and delivering two-hour workshops on social emotional content.
  • Problem solving with directors and other afterschool staff around specific SEL strategies for youth in programming
  • Working collaboratively with all members of the Vermont Afterschool team.

Essential Skills Needed:

  • Significant training and experience in education, youth work, and/or afterschool. BA degree required; MA preferred; at least three years working with children and youth in school or out-of-school time settings as well as experience providing quality coaching and/or mentoring support to professionals.
  • Demonstrated vision and passion for supporting others in creating positive environments for the learning, care, and development of children and youth.
  • Familiarity with professional development models, best practices in quality afterschool programs, SEL concepts and curricula, and Specialized Child Care in Vermont
  • Demonstrated organizational and/or project leadership skills including: collecting and analyzing data; writing reports; developing outreach materials; and fostering positive relationships with a wide variety of afterschool providers, school-based educators, and families.
  • Ability to work independently and with self-direction.
  • Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, including proven record of working collaboratively 
with others.
  • Ability to multi-task with excellent time management and organizational skills.
  • Confidence in solving problems with tenacity and perseverance.
  • Understanding of standard evaluation methods and the ability to analyze data to inform project 
direction and determine training priorities.
  • Proficiency in the use of technology, including MS office products (e.g., Word, Excel, Publisher), and the 
ability to produce documents and reports that are well-written and well-presented.
  • Reliable transportation required. This position will require travel throughout Vermont and may require time in the evenings or on the weekends.

How to apply:

To apply, please send a cover letter, resume, and three references to jobs@vermontafterschool.org. Applications are due by August 30, 2019, and must be submitted electronically. Vermont Afterschool is an equal opportunity employer, and we welcome applications from individuals who will contribute to our diversity.

Data Digest: Our Collective Impact in 2018-19 (Part 2)

Posted on August 1st, 2019 in: Blog

Last month, we reported our FY19 impact numbers for the year spanning July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019. As part of our mission, we help support and empower afterschool, summer and expanded learning programs and one major way that we do this is by providing them with professional development opportunities.

Leaders from at least one out of every five afterschool, summer, and expanded learning programs attended our professional development trainings or workshops between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2018. Leaders from a total of 90 program sites participated in site-specific or regional trainings this past year. We are proud to have been able to make an impact on these programs by offering hands-on, interactive learning experiences for them. Vermont Afterschool hosted 68 site-specific and regional professional development trainings throughout the state in 2018-19.

We collected 577 evaluations for the workshops that we ran in 2018-19. The feedback was encouraging. Overall, 93.4% of training participants fully agreed that they would apply what they learned in their programs. And 92.5% of training participants fully agreed that attending would help them do their jobs better.

In total, these 68 trainings comprised 32 different workshop titles. It was the case that for 14 of the workshop titles, 100% of respondents both fully agreed that they would apply what they learned in their programs AND fully agreed that having attended would help them do their jobs better. Seven of these workshops were attended by at least ten participants in 2018-19. These very highly-evaluated workshops with strong participation were as follows:

  • YPQI: Voice and Choice (23 participants)
  • Leadership: Why should anyone follow me? (22 participants)
  • Me Power! Kids in Action Creating Positive Change (21 participants)
  • STEM: Science on a Shoestring (13 participants)
  • YPQI: Active Learning (11 participants)
  • YPQI: Reframing Conflict (11 participants)
  • Building Connections that Weather the Storm (10 participants)

It is noteworthy that three of these highest-performing workshops were part of the YPQI (Youth Program Quality Intervention) series. Vermont Afterschool has been providing support for programs in engaging in continuous quality improvement through YPQI for almost a decade. Stay tuned for an upcoming post about YPQI and programs that have used the model have been able to systematically improve their program quality over time.

Note: In addition to these site-specific and regional trainings, there were also professional development opportunities that were part of series, such as our communities of practice and Leadership Institute for Resilience in Afterschool (LIRA) that are part of our Youth Resiliency Initiative to help program leaders increase their social-emotional learning practices for their programs. We will be sharing the impact from these very specific training initiatives in a future data digest.

Welcome, Nicole!

Posted on July 15th, 2019 in: Blog

We’ve got some great news to share: Nicole Miller recently joined the Vermont Afterschool team as our new Assistant Director.

In this role at Vermont Afterschool, Nicole will focus on supporting the afterschool field through the lens of strengthening programs. She will co-lead the 21st CCLC director meetings and oversee our professional development systems. Nicole will also coordinate our statewide quality efforts and ensure that the entire Vermont Afterschool team is working in an interconnected manner. 

Nicole began working in youth programs as a senior in high school, and has continued throughout her career. She has ten years of experience directing a 21st CCLC afterschool and summer learning program in rural Vermont, and five years providing professional development workshops for afterschool professionals as a trainer and coach. She has a BA in Elementary Education from Johnson State College, and believes that all youth should have access to high-quality and engaging afterschool, summer, and third space programs. In 2014, Nicole was chosen as a Next Generation Leader from the National AfterSchool Association. She lives in Central Vermont with her two dogs, Ginger and Mollie. 

You can reach Nicole at:
nicole@vermontafterschool.org or 802-448-3464

Nicole (right) at our annual Afterschool & Summer Learning Day at the State House.

Data Digest: Our Collective Impact in 2018-19 (Part 1)

Posted on July 12th, 2019 in: Blog

Here at Vermont Afterschool, our mission is to support organizations in providing quality afterschool, summer, and expanded learning experiences for Vermont’s children and youth. We strive to do this through a variety of initiatives. We provide program leaders with opportunities to do professional development, participate in communities of practice, serve on committees and coalitions, enroll in courses through CCV, receive technical assistance, and much more — the list is ever-growing as we expand our outreach and increase our services.

With all of these initiatives (and more!) we are making an impact on programs statewide. And while we know this intuitively, we’re excited that this year we have strong supporting data to help illustrate our impact. This past year, we made a conscious, rigorous team effort to track all of the program sites in the state that we have served and the various ways that we have done so. 

Town level impact

We can begin to look at our collective impact for 2018-19 on the town-by-town level. There are 255 towns in Vermont, and 172 of them have afterschool, summer and expanded learning programs that serve children and youth. On the map image below, these towns’ borders are outlined. In 2018-19, Vermont Afterschool impacted programs in 74% of towns with afterschool, summer, or expanded learning programs, which was 128 towns in total. The map shows these towns shaded in purple. The darker the shading, the greater our impact. In towns where we either impacted multiple sites, and/or where program leaders themselves engaged with us in multiple ways, our impact is greater. You can check out the dynamic version of this map with more detailed notes here.

Program impact

From July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019, Vermont Afterschool impacted 49% of the afterschool, summer and expanded learning programs in the state. In total, that was 227 of the 465 sites in Vermont. That means that program leaders from each of those 227 sites participated in one or more of our initiatives, served on committees or coalitions, and/or participated in advocacy efforts to help us increase support for the field. Here are just some of the highlights:

Leaders from…

  • 101 program sites participated in one of our year-long Afterschool Professional Learning Strand,
  • 91 program sites attended our annual conference,
  • 90 program sites attended professional development trainings and workshops,
  • 39 program sites worked with us to increase their social-emotional learning programming through our Northfield Savings Bank Youth Resiliency Initiative,
  • 37 programs sites engaged in continued education by enrolling in our CCV courses,
  • 25 program sites participated in state-level advocacy efforts by attending our Afterschool and Summer Learning Day at the statehouse AND by sending youth ambassadors,
  • 19 program sites participated in communities of practice,
  • 8 program sites testified to the state legislature about the benefits of afterschool and summer learning programming, and
  • 7 program sites 7 program sites served on our VT9to26 Coalition for Youth Work and Policy.

We can also look at our impact on licensed sites that serve school aged children and youth. There are 251 licensed sites that serve mainly school age children, and in 2018-19 we served 50% of them — 126 in total. We served these sites in a variety of ways, but here are the top five ways that such program leaders engaged with us:

Leaders from…

  • 55 licensed school age sites attended professional development trainings and workshops,
  • 51 licensed school age sites attended our annual conference,
  • 50 licensed school age sites participated in one of our year-long Afterschool Professional Learning Strands,
  • 26 licensed school age sites worked with us to increase their social-emotional learning programming through our Northfield Savings Bank Youth Resiliency Initiative, and
  • 23 of licensed school age sites engaged in continued education by enrolling in our CCV courses.

We also worked closely with all 101 21st Century Community Learning Center (21C) program sites that were funded in 2018-19; we served 100% of them, since directors and site leaders all participated in our Afterschool Professional Learning Strands

In addition, 21C leaders from…

  • 37 sites attended professional development trainings and workshops,
  • 36 sites attended our annual conference,
  • 28 sites worked with us to increase their social-emotional learning programming through our Northfield Savings Bank Youth Resiliency Initiative,
  • 21 sites participated in state-level advocacy efforts by attending our Afterschool and Summer Learning Day at the statehouse AND by sending youth ambassadors, and
  • 19 sites engaged in continued education by enrolling on one of our CCV courses.

Stay tuned for part two of this post next month when we will look more closely at our impact through our professional development trainings.

Celebrate Summer Learning Week: July 8-12

Posted on July 8th, 2019 in: Blog

Ask educators in any part of the country and they will tell you there’s no debate: summers matter for children, youth, families, and education. That’s why the National Summer Learning Association (NSLA) will lead the country in National Summer Learning Week (July 8 – 12, 2019), an awareness and advocacy celebration that aims to elevate the importance of high-quality summer programs in keeping children and youth safe, healthy, and learning every summer.

Recent research published by the RAND Corporation points to findings from a Wallace Foundation study — the largest-ever study of summer learning — which showed that students with high attendance in free, five- to six-week, voluntary summer learning programs experienced educationally meaningful benefits in math and reading. 

“High-quality summer and afterschool programs can change the trajectory of a young person’s life. For our nation, the summer months present an opportunity to close educational and opportunity gaps that often begin at birth and to seize the summer months as a time for kids to catch up, keep up and grow strong for the school year ahead,” said Aaron Philip Dworkin, CEO of NSLA. 

Each day of NSLA’s National Summer Learning Week focuses on a different critical summer issue, from literacy or the enriching possibilities of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) to arts programming and summertime programs that introduce children to career possibilities. 

Summer also is about ensuring our country’s most vulnerable youth have access to good nutrition. By dedicating one day specifically to nutrition and wellness, NSLA draws attention to the fact that the inequities of summer also extend to food security. According to the Food Research and Action Center, only one in seven youth eligible for summer meal programs receive them, which means many children go hungry when school is not in session. 

National Summer Learning Week highlights:

  • Hundreds of celebrations and summer activities with libraries, museums, summer camps and school district partners coast to coast.
  • Launch of a summer public service campaign featuring 1,000 #KeepKidsLearning digital billboards by Clear Channel Outdoor Americas. 
  • iHeartMedia summer learning PSAs voiced by Dr. Steve Perry, a daytime TV host and “America’s educator.” 
  • A website (summerlearning.org) with summer resources like the Summer Stride Tip Sheet and Scholastic Read-a-Palooza Summer Reading Challenge.
  • Numerous meaningful participation opportunities in the week for parents, children, educators, and professionals leading summer programs.

National Summer Learning Week offers parents, children, and program providers free summer learning tools and academic readiness checks, along with an opportunity to advocate for change and ask Congress to protect summer and afterschool program funding. For more information on National Summer Learning Week and opportunities to participate, visit www.summerlearning.org/summer-learning-week

Welcome, Robin!

Posted on June 5th, 2019 in: Blog, vermontafterschool

We are thrilled to share that Robin Katrick has joined the Vermont Afterschool team as our new Youth and Community Health Coordinator.

In this role at Vermont Afterschool, Robin will be piloting the Vermont Youth Project in several Vermont communities as well as supporting afterschool programs and staff with prevention tools and resources. The Vermont Youth Project is a community-driven collaborative designed to embrace positive youth development at the local level. At the root of the Vermont Youth Project is a data collection tool that will be based off the Iceland Prevention Model and encourages parents and communities to be engaged around positive youth development. Risk and protective factors are analyzed from an annual youth survey, which allows for targeted interventions at the local level.

Robin has several years of experience in community development, program development, and community health. At the start of her career, she has spent time overseas working with rural communities on sustainable development, clean water, and education projects. In Vermont, Robin has worked in wellness with the State of Vermont and most recently worked with the University of Vermont Medical Center developing a primary prevention program in Chittenden County. Robin has her BA in Community Development and Public Health and is currently working toward her MPH. She holds certifications in facilitative leadership, health coaching, running coaching, and EFL. Robin lives in Chittenden County with her husband and two dogs and enjoys long distance running, cycling, hiking, and being outdoors.

You can reach Robin at:
robin@vermontafterschool.org or 802-448-3464

June’s Data Digest: Post High School Plans

Posted on June 1st, 2019 in: Blog

This blog post, by our Research Analyst Erin Schwab, is part of a monthly series unpacking data from the 2017 YRBS survey and making connections to out-of-school time programming in Vermont.

Happy graduation season! In the coming weeks, high school seniors around Vermont are finishing up classes and are making (or have already made) big decisions about What Comes Next. Data from the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) tell us that 83% of Vermont’s high school seniors would “definitely or probably” enroll in some type of post-secondary education such as a vocational training program, military service, community college, or a four-year college. Among seniors in particular, 79% of them indicated that they would “definitely or probably” attend post-secondary education. [Note that, as of 2015 data from the Vermont Agency of Education, only 60% of Vermont students who graduated with a regular high school diploma went on to enroll in an institution of higher education within 16 months of their high school graduation date.]

We know from research that afterschool and summer learning programs contribute to college and career readiness for youth. Some programs expose youth to the idea and importance of college in direct ways by taking them on campus visits and work with families to help get the process started. Many more programs put students on the path to selecting and attending post-secondary education by providing them with opportunities to learn about careers and participate in formative experiences such as internships and community service projects. And while classroom learning provides theoretical knowledge, afterschool programs provide opportunities for students to apply their learning in tangible ways, such as by working in teams on real-world problem-solving. From attending afterschool programs, youth can gain a better idea of how to navigate their futures than those who do not.

Results from the 2017 YRBS, which was completed by about 20,000 high school students across Vermont show that among students who did not participate in any amount of afterschool programming during the 2016-17 school year, 65% were planning on pursuing post-secondary education. As the number of average weekly hours of afterschool programming increased (up to 19 hours per week), so did the percentage of students who indicated on the survey that they planned on enrolling in school beyond high school: 82% of students who attended 1-4 weekly hours of programming, 88% of students who attended 5-9 hours of weekly programming, and 91% of students who attended between 10 and 19 weekly hours of programming.

At each level of programming, the percentages of students who said they would attend post-secondary education were slightly higher for high school seniors specifically. Seventy-one percent of seniors who did not attend any afterschool programming in 2016-17 said they would enroll in post-secondary education. And as with the student body overall, these percentages also increased incrementally for each level of weekly hours of afterschool programming. Among seniors who participated in 1-4 weekly hours of programming, 87% said they would attend post secondary education; among seniors who participated in 5-9 weekly hours of programming, 91% said they would attend post secondary education; and among seniors who participated in 10-19 weekly hours of programming, 93% said they would attend post secondary education.

The 2017 YRBS data show that high school students who attend more hours of afterschool programming are more likely to say that the will “probably or definitely” attend post-secondary education such as a vocational training program, military service, community college, or a four-year college after high school. While there are many factors that contribute to students’ decisions about what path(s) to pursue after high school, we are confident that afterschool plays a positive role in helping prepare students to continue their education in prepared and intentional ways.

Read past Data Digest blog posts here:

2019 Youth4Youth Grant Awards Announced

Posted on May 2nd, 2019 in: Blog, vermontafterschool

From a cultural diversity day to building school bike trails to a writing workshop to a rabbit adoption event, 14 different youth-led projects are about to launch across Vermont thanks to the 2019 Youth4Youth Grants.

Grant amounts ranged from $100 to $3000 and were open to any Vermont youth age 10 to 22 to apply. Young people from all across the state voted on the 44 proposals and selected the 14 finalists. The 14 grant recipients were announced in April with an awards ceremony at the State House on April 12, 2019.

Miles Robbason, an 11-year-old from West Rutland, wrote a grant called “STEAMing All the Way to California.” The grant will fund his Lego Robotics team to travel to California, where his team will show off their robot they built that does autonomous missions.

“This grant is going to be really helpful for us because the cost of this experience is staggering,” explained Miles. “This is a one in a lifetime experience.”

Alia Ross, a 14-year-old from Winooski, co-wrote a grant with three other Winooski students that will create supervised areas in the Winooski Middle/High School where teens can hang out after school ends when waiting for sports practice to start, or waiting for a ride to pick them up, or simply have a safe place to be with friends or do homework.

“We’re really excited for this grant,” emphasized Ross. “We aim to get it up and running in just a few weeks.”

A project of Vermont Afterschool, the statewide Vermont Youth Council designed the grant program with the goal of inspiring youth-initiated projects that will benefit Vermont’s young people. The grant program funded proposals across Vermont that promote a wide array of rights identified in the Youth Declaration of Rights, which was written in Fall 2017 exclusively by youth between ages 9 and 22.

This is the first year of the Youth4Youth Grants, with plans to expand the grant process for the next round of funding.

“We so grateful to the Vermont Department of Health for supporting this project,” stated Vermont Afterschool Executive Director Holly Morehouse. The Department of Health provided funding for the Youth4Youth grants, as well as to Vermont Afterschool for the creation of the Vermont Youth Council and a new statewide initiative focused on elevating youth voice.

According to Morehouse, “We cannot underestimate the importance of fostering a sense of belonging for our young people, which in turn connects to healthy lives and well-being. This is an important step for our state to recognize and support our youth in helping them to feel empowered, try new things, and feel connected within their communities.”

2019 Youth4Youth Grant Awardees

$100-$1500 Projects $1500-$3000 Projects
Burke Town School Bike Trails | Burke Build bike trials on the school’s campus to provide recreational access for all students. Mi Vida, Mi Voz: A Writing Workshop | Shelburne A weekend writing workshop for migrant youth to explore their voice and connect with others.
Cultural Diversity Day | East Montpelier Spread cultural awareness to the school and greater community through a day of activities. STEAMing All the Way to California | Rutland Travel to a national Lego robotics competition to compete against and meet other teams from all over the world.
Dog-A-Thon | Shelburne A running race and dog adoption event to raise money for the Humane Society. Summer Bowling | Springfield Create weekly bowling clubs for grades K-12 during youth-led summer programming.
Never Have I Ever | Springfield Provide funding for foster families to be able to access fun community resources and experiences. Rabbit Adoption and Drop Off Agency | Shelburne Create a place where people can foster and adopt rabbits.
Reducing Hunger in Our Community | Burke Working with existing community partners to make and donate meals to those in need. The Winooski Hang-Out: A Place for Everyone After School | Winooski Provide middle and high school youth a flexible, safe and supportive space to hang out after school.
Ski Trip | Burlington A trip to Cochran’s ski area for DREAM program mentees. VTeen 4-H Science Pathways Cafe / Summer of Science | Royalton Provide science education programs both for and run by youth in their communities.
Vermont Youth Voices Rally | Waterbury Sustainability awareness and advocacy event with informational booths and activities. Winooski School Band Private Lesson | Winooski Provide private lessons for members of the school band from professional musicians.

New SEL video

Posted on May 1st, 2019 in: Blog

We’re thrilled to share our new social emotional learning (SEL) video produced by Mondo Mediaworks. This video highlights our SEL leadership and training initiative, also known as the Youth Resiliency Project, that is funded by the Northfield Savings Bank Foundation and launched in Fall 2018. This project is focused on supporting afterschool and out-of-school time programs and professionals in helping children and youth to build resiliency and SEL skills.

Many thanks to the staff and students at One Planet and Burlington Kids afterschool programs for their willingness to participate in this short video!

Vermont Afterschool’s Youth Resiliency Project is focused on supporting afterschool and out-of-school time programs and professionals in helping children and youth to build resilience and social emotional learning (SEL) skills. Our goals with this project are to:

  • Increase competency across the region so that more afterschool, summer, and out-of-school time programs are trauma-informed;
  • Create a Leadership Institute for Resilience in Afterschool (LIRA) to empower peer experts in the field; and
  • Establish networks of support for afterschool program sites so they build and sustain SEL best practices going forward via a communities of practice training model.

Impact Update March 2019:

  • To date, we have trained 219 afterschool professionals and direct service staff members in SEL and trauma-informed strategies
  • There are 5 different communities of practice running with 43 different program sites participating
  • LIRA is training 14 afterschool leaders over the course of the next six months with participants receiveing a SEL micro-credential at the conclusion
  • Thus far, 6,216 students in grades PreK-12 from a total of 47 towns across Chittenden, Orange, and Washington counties have benefitted from this Project

May’s Data Digest: Depression and Suicide

Posted on May 1st, 2019 in: Blog

This blog post, by our Research Analyst Erin Schwab, is part of a monthly series unpacking data from the 2017 YRBS survey and making connections to out-of-school time programming in Vermont.

Ah, spring. Color is finally starts to reappear in our landscapes and the excitement of warm weather and sunshine gives us all a much-needed boost. Or does it? Springtime is actually the peak time of year for suicides. While the reasons are not yet well-understood, April, May and June see a spike in suicides in the northern hemisphere (with the same phenomenon happening in the spring months of October, November and December in the southern hemisphere).

Regardless of the time of year, depressive feelings and thoughts of suicide impact people of all ages. High school students navigating social pressures, bullying, and all kinds of changes and pressure in their lives can be especially vulnerable. Fortunately, we know that opportunities for engagement within school and community such as afterschool activities are protective factors against depression and suicide for adolescents.

Results from the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), which was completed by about 20,000 high school students across Vermont, show a negative correlation between afterschool participation and depression, suicidal behaviors, and self-harm among youth.

One survey item asked the youth whether they felt sad or hopeless — so much so that they stopped doing regular activities — almost every day for at least two weeks in the past year. One-third of students who did not participate in any afterschool programming reported that they had this experience. Among students who participated in between one and four hours of afterschool programming, this rate dropped to 25%. And for students who participated in 5-9 hours of afterschool activities and 10-19 hours, the percentages that said they had been depressed for two weeks was 19% and 18%, respectively.

Afterschool participation was also linked with a decrease in the percentage of youth who reported hurting themselves — such as by intentionally cutting or burning themselves — at some point in the year leading up to the survey. Twenty-two percent of students who were not participating in any afterschool activities at the time of the survey reported hurting themselves at some point in the most recent year. This percentage dropped to 15% for students who participated in between one and four hours of weekly afterschool programming and to 13% for students who participated in between five and 19 hours of weekly afterschool programming.

Some high school students went so far as to make a suicide plan in the year preceding the survey. Fifteen percent of students who were not enrolled in any afterschool activities reported that they had made a suicide plan at some point. Among students who participated in between one and four hours of weekly programming, this percentage decreased to 10%. For students who participated in between five and 19 hours of weekly afterschool programming, 9% reported having made a suicide plan at some point that year.

Finally, a small but significant percentage of high school students in Vermont actually attempted suicide in the year leading up to the 2017 YRBS. Eight percent of students who were not enrolled in any afterschool activities reported that they had attempted suicide at some point. Among students who participated in between one and four hours of weekly programming, this rate decreased to 5%. For students who participated in between five and 19 hours of weekly afterschool programming, 4% reported having attempted suicide at some point that year.

While we don’t like seeing that any amount of high school students in Vermont are depressed and/or suicidal, we are encouraged by the fact that afterschool participation help bring these percentages down. The more that youth can feel connected with their school and community and have a voice, the less likely they will fall victim to depression, self-harm and thoughts and attempts of suicide.

Please note: If you know someone who is thinking about hurting themselves and/or committing suicide, reach out to the national suicide hotline (24/7) at 1-800-273-8255.

Read past Data Digest blog posts here:

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